Wear of Insignia and Accouterments

Brassards

a. Brassards are worn as identification to designate personnel who are required to perform a special task or to deal with the public. Brassards are made of cloth; they are 17 to 20 inches long and 4 inches wide and of colors specified. When more than one color is specified for the brassard, the colors are of equal width and run lengthwise on the brassard. Brassards are worn on the left sleeve of the outer garment, with the bottom edge of the brassard approxi- mately 2 inches above the elbow (see fig 28–150).
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b. Descriptions of current authorized brassards.
(1) Acting noncommissioned officer brassard. The brassard consists of gold-colored chevrons on a dark blue background. Trainees or candidates acting as noncommissioned officers in schools or training centers wear this brassard. (See figs 28–151 and 28–152 for the sergeant and corporal brassards.)
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(2) Acting officer brassard. The brassard consists of white stripes on an olive-drab background, centered, and parallel with the long side of the brassard. Trainees or candidates acting as commissioned officers in schools or training centers wear this brassard.
(a) Captain: three white stripes (see fig 28–153).
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(b) First lieutenant: two white stripes (see fig 28–154).
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(c) Second lieutenant: one white stripe (see fig 28–155).
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(3) Armed Forces Police brassard. The brassard consists of the words “Armed Forces Police” on three lines in yellow block letters on a black cloth background, 20 inches long and 4 inches wide, with a cloth extension 5–11/16 inches high, centered above the words, for display of shoulder sleeve insignia. Personnel wear the shoulder sleeve insignia 1⁄2 inch below the top of the brassard. Members of armed forces police detachments wear the brassard while on duty (see fig 28–156).
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(4) Army community service brassard. The brassard consists of the Army community service emblem in appropriate colors centered over the words “ARMY COMMUNITY SERVICE,” aligned vertically on a blue background. Military personnel, civilian employees, and volunteer personnel engaged in Army community service activities wear the brassard when ready identification is required (see fig 28–157).
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(5) Explosive ordnance disposal brassard. The brassard consists of a black projectile shape pointed downward, bearing a red conventional drop bomb fringed in yellow, on a dark-blue background. Explosive ordnance disposal personnel wear the brassard while performing disposal activities (see fig 28–158).
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(6) Gas brassard. The brassard consists of the word “GAS” in golden orange letters, on a cobalt-blue background. Personnel assigned gas duties in a theater of operations wear the brassard (see fig 28–159).
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(7) Geneva Convention brassard. The brassard consists of a red Geneva cross on a white background. Medical personnel wear the brassard, subject to the direction of competent military authority. When the brassard is worn, personnel are exclusively engaged in the search for, collection, transport, or treatment of the wounded or sick; or in the prevention of disease. The brassard also is worn by staff exclusively engaged in the administration of medical units and establishments, and it is worn by chaplains attached to the armed forces. Veterinary units are not considered medical units and do not wear the Geneva Convention brassards; they wear the Veterinary Corps brassard (see fig 28–160).
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(8) Mourning brassard. The brassard consists of plain black, or black crepe material. Personnel wear the brassard on the Army uniform, at the discretion of the wearer, only when actually present at a funeral, or en route to or from the funeral. Funeral escorts wear the brassard when prescribed by the Secretary of the Army (see fig 28–161).
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(9) Military Police brassard.
(a) Non-subdued. The brassard consists of the letters “MP” in white block letters, 21⁄2 inches high, on a dark-blue or black background, 20 inches long and 41⁄8 inches wide, with an extension 5–11/16 inches high, centered above the letters for display of shoulder sleeve insignia. The blue or black brassard is worn with the Army green uniform coat, or when the AG 415 shirt, black pullover or unisex cardigan sweaters, and the black windbreaker or black all-weather coat are worn as outer garments. Military Police personnel wear these brassards when authorized by the local commander.
(b) Subdued. The subdued MP brassard is worn with utility uniforms when performing tactical duties in the field. The subdued version has black lettering on an olive-green background or spicebrown embroidery on khaki background for the desert camouflage uniform, and it has a Velcro closure. The local commander may authorize wear of the non- subdued MP brassard when personnel are performing garrison law enforcement duties. Personnel will not wear the MP brassard and badge at the same time. Military Police personnel wear these brassards when authorized by the local commander (see fig 28–162).
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(10) Movement control brassard. The brassard consists of the words “MOVEMENT CONTROL” in golden yellow block letters on a brick-red background. Military movement control personnel wear the brassard. Other designated personnel may wear the brassard in the field, when prescribed (see fig 28–163).
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(11) Officer of the day brassard. The brassard consists of the letters “OD” in yellow block letters on a dark blue background. The officer of the day wears the brassard, as designated by the appropriate commander (see fig 28–164).
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(12) Officer of the guard brassard. The brassard consists of the letters “OG” in yellow block letters on a dark blue background. The officer of the guard wears the brassard, as designated by the appropriate commander (see fig 28–165).
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(13) Photographer brassard. The brassard consists of the words “US ARMY PHOTOGRAPHER” on two lines, in golden-orange block letters on an ultramarine-blue background. U.S. Army photographers wear the brassard when actually performing photographic duties (see fig 28–166).
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(14) Port brassard. The brassard consists of the letters “TC” in golden-yellow block letters on a brick-red back- ground. Transportation Corps military personnel wear the brassard when prescribed by the port or Army terminal commander (see fig 28–167).
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(15) Trainees in leadership courses brassard. The brassard consists of a golden-yellow and dark-blue “compass rose” on a dark-blue background. All students attending leadership courses wear the brassard (see fig 28–168).
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(16) Unit Police brassard. The brassard consists of the letters “UP” in yellow block letters on a dark-blue back- ground. Army personnel, other than members of the Military Police Corps, wear the brassard while performing duties as unit traffic guides, courtesy patrols, security guards, or other police-type functions, when prescribed by the appropriate commander (see fig 28–169).
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(17) Veterinary Corps brassard. The brassard consists of a green cross on a white background. Members of the Veterinary Service wear the brassard, when prescribed (see fig 28–170).
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(18) CID brassard.
(a) Non-subdued. The brassard consists of white lettering (CID) on a blue background. Special agents of the USACIDC and accredited supervisors wear the brassard, as determined by the appropriate USACIDC commander (see fig 28–171).
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(b) Subdued and desert brassards. The brassard is available in subdued and desert versions. The subdued brassard has black lettering on an olive-green background. The desert brassard has spice-brown lettering on a khaki background. Special agents of the USACIDC and accredited supervisors wear the subdued and desert brassards, as determined by the appropriate USACIDC commander.
(19) Personnel assistance point brassard. The brassard consists of the words “MILITARY ASSISTANCE” on two lines, in white lettering on a black background, 20 inches long and 41⁄4 inches wide, with an extension 53⁄4 inches high centered above the letters for display of shoulder sleeve insignia. Qualified personnel working at personnel assistance points wear the brassard, at the direction of the Total Army Personnel Command commander (see fig 27–172).
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