Introduction

Wear of jewelry

. Soldiers may wear a wristwatch, a wrist identification bracelet, and a total of two rings (a wedding set is considered one ring) with Army uniforms, unless prohibited by the commander for safety or health reasons. Any jewelry soldiers wear must be conservative and in good taste. Identification bracelets are limited to medical alert bracelets and MIA/POW identification bracelets. Soldiers may wear only one item on each wrist. b. No jewelry, other than that described…

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Introduction

Uniformity of material

a. When soldiers exercise their option to choose among various fabrics authorized for uniforms, they must ensure that all garments (coats, trousers, skirts, and slacks) are made of the same material. However, junior and senior ROTC cadets may wear garrison caps made of polyester-wool blend (AG shade 489) or all polyester (AG shade 491) interchangeably with service uniforms of either shade. b. When gold lace (sleeve or trouser ornamentation) or gold bullion is prescribed for…

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Introduction

Distinctive uniforms and uniform items

a. The following uniform items are distinctive and will not be sold to or worn by unauthorized personnel: (1) All Army headgear, when worn with insignia. (2) Badges and tabs (identification, marksmanship, combat, and special skill). (3) Uniform buttons (U.S. Army or Corps of Engineers). (4) Decorations, service medals, service and training ribbons, and other awards and their appurtenances. (5) Insignia of any design or color that the Army has adopted. b. Individuals will remove…

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Introduction

When the wear of the Army uniform is required or prohibited

a. All personnel will wear the Army uniform when on duty, unless granted an exception by the commander to wear civilian clothes. The wear of civilian clothing on duty is subject to the provisions of AR 700–84. The following personnel may grant exceptions: (1) Commanders of major commands. (2) Assistant Secretaries, the Secretary of Defense or his designee, or the Secretary of the Army. (3) Heads of Department of Defense agencies. (4) Heads of Department…

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Introduction

Personal appearance policies

a. General. The Army is a uniformed service where discipline is judged, in part, by the manner in which a soldier wears a prescribed uniform, as well as by the individual’s personal appearance. Therefore, a neat and well-groomed appearance by all soldiers is fundamental to the Army and contributes to building the pride and esprit essential to an effective military force. A vital ingredient of the Army’s strength and military effectiveness is the pride and…

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Introduction

Hair and fingernail standards and grooming policies

Interested in AR-670-1 compliant gloves? Click HERE to read the top 10 list of the best AR670-1 compliant military gloves! a. Hair. (1) General. The requirement for hair grooming standards is necessary to maintain uniformity within a military population. Many hairstyles are acceptable, as long as they are neat and conservative. It is not possible to address every acceptable hairstyle, or what constitutes eccentric or conservative grooming. Therefore, it is the responsibility of leaders at…

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Introduction

Uniform appearance and fit

a. Appearance. (1) All personnel will maintain a high standard of dress and appearance. Uniforms will fit properly; trousers, pants, or skirts should not fit tightly; and personnel must keep uniforms clean and serviceable and press them as necessary. Soldiers must project a military image that leaves no doubt that they live by a common military standard and are responsible to military order and discipline. Soldiers will ensure that articles carried in pockets do not…

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Introduction

Classification of service and utility or field uniforms

a. The male class A service uniform consists of the Army green (AG) coat and trousers, a short- or long-sleeved AG shade 415 shirt with a black four-in-hand tie, and other authorized accessories. b. The male class B service uniform is the same as class A, except the service coat is not worn. The black four-in- hand tie is required with the long-sleeved AG shade 415 shirt when the long-sleeved shirt is worn without the…

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Introduction

How to recommend changes to Army uniforms

a. Army Ideas For Excellence Program (AIEP). If a major Army command (MACOM) recommends approval of an AIEP suggestion, the recommendation will be forwarded to the Project Manager-Soldier Systems (SEQ), Bldg. 328, 5901 Putnam Road, Fort Belvoir, VA 22060–5852, for consideration. Each suggestion forwarded to the project manager will reflect the MACOM position; contain all appropriate supporting documentation; and be signed by the commander, deputy commander, chief of staff, or comparable level official. Suggestions not…

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Introduction

General

a. Only uniforms, accessories, and insignia prescribed in this regulation or in the common tables of allowance (CTA), or as approved by Headquarters, Department of the Army (HQDA), will be worn by personnel in the U.S. Army. Unless specified in this regulation, the commander issuing the clothing and equipment will establish wear policies for organizational clothing and equipment. No item governed by this regulation will be altered in any way that changes the basic design…

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