Wear of Insignia and Accouterments

Overseas service bars

a. Large. A goldenlite rayon-embroidered bar, 3/16 inches wide 1–5/16 inches long, on a green background that forms a 3/32-inch border around the bar. All personnel are authorized to wear the large overseas service bar. Enlisted soldiers must wear large overseas service bars with large rank and service stripe insignia.
b. Small. A goldenlite rayon-embroidered bar, 5/32 inch wide and 13/32 inch long, on a green background that forms a 5/64-inch border around the bar. All personnel are authorized to wear the small overseas service bar. Enlisted soldiers must wear small overseas service bars with small rank and service stripe insignia.
c. How worn. The overseas service bar is worn centered on the outside bottom half of the right sleeve of the Army green uniform coat. The lower edge of the overseas service bar is placed 1⁄4 inch above the sleeve braid of the coat for officer personnel, and 4 inches above and parallel to the bottom of the sleeve for enlisted personnel. Each additional bar is spaced 1/16 inch above, and parallel to the first bar (see fig 28–149).
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d. By whom worn. Soldiers are authorized wear of the overseas service bar as indicated below.
(1) One overseas service bar is authorized for each 6–month period of active Federal service as a member of a U.S. Service outside CONUS, from 7 December 1941 until 2 September 1946, both dates inclusive. In computing overseas service, Alaska is considered outside CONUS. An overseas service bar is not authorized for a fraction of a 6–month period.
(2) One overseas service bar is authorized for each 6–month period of active Federal service as a member of a U.S. Service in Korea, from 27 June 1950 until 27 July 1954, both dates inclusive. Credit toward an overseas service bar is authorized for each month of active Federal service as a member of the U.S. Army serving in the designated hostile fire area in Korea from 1 April 1968 until 31 August 1973. The months of arrival to, and departure from the hostile fire pay area are counted as whole months. When credit is given for a month for hostile fire pay, credit for a corresponding month is given toward an overseas service bar.
(3) One overseas service bar is authorized for each 6–month period active Federal service as a member of a U.S. Service in Vietnam, from 1 July 1958 to 28 March 1973. The months of arrival to, and departure from Vietnam are counted as whole months for credit toward the overseas service bar. Periods of TDY service in Vietnam where credit is given for hostile fire pay for 1 month, also may be given credit for a corresponding month towards award of an overseas service bar.
(4) One overseas service bar is authorized for each 6–month period of Federal service as a member of a U.S. Service in the Dominican Republic, from 29 April 1965 to 21 September 1966, both dates inclusive.
(5) One overseas service bar is authorized for each 6–month period of Federal service as a member of a U.S. Service in Laos, from 1 January 1966 to 28 March 1973.
(6) One overseas service bar is authorized for each 6–month period of Federal service as a member of a U.S. Service in Cambodia from 1 January 1971 until 28 March 1973. Personnel must qualify for hostile fire pay to receive credit for an overseas service bar. The months of arrival to, and departure from the hostile fire pay area are counted as whole months.
(7) One overseas service bar is authorized for each 6–month period of Federal service as a member of a U.S. Service in Lebanon, from 6 August 1983 to 24 April 1984, for the two units listed in paragraph 28–17b(6). The months of arrival to, and departure from the hostile fire pay area are counted as whole months.
(8) One overseas service bar is authorized for each 6–month period of Federal service as a member of a U.S. Service in the Persian Gulf from 27 July 1987 to 1 August 1990, for Operation Earnest Will. The months of arrival to, and departure from Operation Earnest Will are counted as whole months.
(9) One overseas service bar is authorized for each 6–month period of Federal service as a member of a U.S. Service in the Persian Gulf from 17 January 1991 to 31 August 1993, for Operation Desert Storm. The months of arrival to, and departure from Operation Desert Storm are counted as whole months.
(10) One overseas service bar is authorized for each 6–month period of Federal service as a member of a U.S. Service who participated in El Salvador, from 1 January 1981 to 1 February 1992. The months of arrival to, and departure from El Salvador are counted as whole months.
(11) One overseas service bar is authorized for each 6-month period of Federal service as a member of a U.S.
Service in Somalia, from 5 December 1992 to 31 March 1995. The months of arrival to, and departure from Somalia are counted as whole months.
(12) One overseas service bar is authorized for each 6-month period of Federal service as a member of a U.S. Service participating in Operation Enduring Freedom, the CENTCOM area of operations, or under the control of the Combatant Commander, CENTCOM, from 19 September 2001 to a date to be determined. The months of arrival to, and departure from the CENTCOM area of operations are counted as whole months.
(13) One overseas service bar is authorized for each 6–month period of Federal service as a member of a U.S. Service participating in Operation Iraqi Freedom, the CENTCOM area of operations, or under the control of the Combatant Commander, CENTCOM, from 19 March 2003 to a date to be determined. The months of arrival to, and departure from the CENTCOM area of operations are counted as whole months.
(14) Service as a member of a U.S. Armed Service for periods of less than 6 months duration, which otherwise meets the requirements for the award of overseas service bars, may be combined by adding the number of months to determine creditable service toward the total number of overseas service bars authorized for the following: World War II, Korea, Vietnam, The Dominican Republic, Laos, Cambodia, Lebanon, Operation Earnest Will, Grenada, Operation Just Cause, Operation Desert Storm, El Salvador, Somalia, Operation Enduring Freedom, and Operation Iraqi Freedom.
e. Computation of World War II service.
(1) Service is computed between the dates of departure from, and arrival to a port in the United States or the boundary of CONUS. The day of departure and the day of return are included. The expression “each 6-month period of Federal service” is interpreted to authorize the wear of an overseas service bar for overseas service of various lengths, performed either continuously or at intervals, when the total service equaled or exceeded 6 months. Thus, an individual who served 4 months and 10 days outside CONUS and returned there, and subsequently departed from the United States to the same or another theater or country, and served an additional 1 month and 20 days, is entitled to one bar. All active duty or service outside CONUS (permanent, temporary, detached, and so forth) is included in computing length of service, provided that the official duty of the individual required his or her presence outside CONUS.
(2) Military personnel who served on transport vessels and on aircraft became eligible to wear the bar when their total service outside CONUS equaled or exceeded 6 months.
(3) Service on the Great Lakes and in any harbor, bay, or other enclosed arm of the sea along the coast, and that part of the sea which is within 3 miles of the continental limits of the United States, is not included in computing length of service required.
(4) Periods during which military personnel were absent without leave or were in a desertion status, are not included in computing length of service required.
(5) Periods during which military personnel were in the United States on temporary duty, detached service, or leave (even though the individual was assigned overseas) are not included in computing length of service required.
(6) Periods during which military personnel were in confinement, which resulted in time lost as described in section 6 of the Uniform Code of Military Justice (chapter 47, title 10, United States Code), are not included in computing length of service required.